Tiramisu Veloce

Tiramisu Veloce

Quick Tiramisu

“Would you like some of the local liqueur with your Tiramisu?” I don’t need to be asked twice. There’s a thunderstorm raging away outside and I’ll take any amount of liqueur, local or not, to take my mind off it. Five minutes later, a glorious looking tiramisu arrives at the table. I admire it for a moment before digging my spoon in. I chomp down and discover that the local liqueur has more in common with Listerine than any drinking alcohol. I’m not happy but I devour it anyway, it is tiramisu after all.

Whenever we head to Italy on holiday, tiramisu is never far from the top of my list to eat. I love it but no matter how many times I order it here, it never quite matches (most of) the ones I’ve had in Italy. I have a sneaking suspicion that it’s not only how they make it but also the fact that we are on holiday, usually enjoying good weather and in an entirely different state of mind.

This isn’t an authentic tiramisu. This is the version I served at my recent Pop-Up Restaurant in Johnson’s, Newbridge. Any tiramisu I have made in the past uses raw egg yolk in the mascarpone cream but I wasn’t entirely comfortable with serving people raw egg. Instead of picking a different dessert I decided to experiment with ways to exclude the egg. Quite surprisingly, it wasn’t too difficult and although many Italians will probably scoff at this, I’m pretty happy with the result.

Never mess with a classic…..

“Never mess with a classic” is a mantra I follow most of the time but I completely disregard it with this recipe. Not only did I serve a tiramisu without raw egg, I also used an entirely different biscuit to the usual savoiardi (ladyfingers/sponge fingers). I find that savoiardi go too soggy and I like a bit of crunch in my tiramisu. I prefer to use amaretti biscuits which are quite light and hold their crunch even after being dipped in coffee and liqueur. With all of this in mind, if you would rather make a classic tiramisu then give Gino D’Acampo’s a try here.

Serves 4-6

250g Mascarpone Cheese
75g Caster Sugar
250ml Cream, whipped after measuring.
1 tsp Vanilla Extract
125g Amaretto or Savoiardi Biscuits
250ml Espresso/Strong Coffee (cold)
Amaretto Liqueur to taste
2 tbsp Cocoa Powder

Add the mascarpone and sugar to a mixing bowl and beat vigorously with a wooden spoon until smooth and light. Once well beaten, whisk the mixture for a couple of minutes to lighten further before folding in the cream with a spatula. Mix through the vanilla extract and your preferred amount of liqueur.

Mix the coffee with liqueur to taste. Quickly dip the biscuits, one at a time into the coffee and put a layer on the bottom of your dish or into individual serving glasses. Add a layer of the mascarpone mix on top before adding another layer of dipped biscuits. Top the dish/glasses with the rest of the mascarpone mixture and refrigerate for 6 hours or overnight to set.

Just before serving, sieve the cocoa powder on top.

Tiramisu Veloce



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